Tag: Civility

Thank Goodness I Was Bullied! DTH Episode 152 with Madonna Hanna

๐“๐ก๐š๐ง๐ค ๐†๐จ๐จ๐๐ง๐ž๐ฌ๐ฌ ๐ˆ ๐–๐š๐ฌ ๐๐ฎ๐ฅ๐ฅ๐ข๐ž๐!
Many may be struck by this statement, some may even find it a bit offensive. That I can understand, because when I first read it, I was a bit struck too. Those who have been bullied may even find the statement a bit hurtful and that is by no means the intention. Regular listeners to the DTH podcast know that I speak often of the lessons of my life, and this is definitely one of those times. Both my guest, Madonna Hanna, and I speak on this topic with passion and vulnerability from a position of personal experience. It is my great honor to have met, and share with all of you, this conversation my new friend Madonna Hanna because of her statement, “Thank goodness I was bullied!”
๐–๐ก๐จ ๐ข๐ฌ ๐Œ๐š๐๐จ๐ง๐ง๐š ๐. ๐‡๐š๐ง๐ง๐š?
Madonna was born on the Pensacola Naval Base and was raised in the conservative white suburbs of Boston, Massachusetts during the 60s and 70s. She was the only African-American student in her elementary school class. Her parents overcame incredible obstacles of discrimination to provide their family with the American dream of a suburban middle-class lifestyle.
Despite her creativity and talent, Madonna faced bullying, racial prejudice, and isolation at school due to the color of her skin. At that time, many white parents would not allow their children to play with her, which is why she only had a few friends.
The pain, loneliness, and injustice Madonna experienced could have destroyed her. But reflecting on it now, she recognizes that these adversities taught her how to meet future challenges with determination. It also informed her decision to always treat others with respect and compassion.
๐‡๐ž๐š๐ซ ๐ฆ๐จ๐ซ๐ž ๐š๐›๐จ๐ฎ๐ญ ๐Œ๐š๐๐จ๐ง๐ง๐š’๐ฌ ๐ฌ๐ญ๐จ๐ซ๐ฒ ๐ข๐ง ๐ญ๐ก๐ข๐ฌ ๐ฉ๐จ๐ฐ๐ž๐ซ๐Ÿ๐ฎ๐ฅ ๐ž๐ฉ๐ข๐ฌ๐จ๐๐ž ๐š๐ง๐ ๐Ÿ๐ข๐ง๐ ๐ญ๐ก๐ž ๐Ÿ๐ฎ๐ฅ๐ฅ ๐ฌ๐ก๐จ๐ฐ ๐ง๐จ๐ญ๐ž๐ฌ ๐š๐ญ ๐ฐ๐ฐ๐ฐ.๐ƒ๐ž๐ซ๐š๐ญ๐ž๐“๐ก๐ž๐‡๐š๐ญ๐ž.๐œ๐จ๐ฆ

What Makes Up Your Web of Beliefs? …DTH Episode 138 with Dr. Francis Collins

What makes up your web of beliefs?

Those who have followed the DTH podcast for long know about my work with the organization Braver Angels. One vitally important part of that work is a project that I have been working on with Dr. Francis Collins. (Learn more about the “Truth & Trust Project” byย  listening to DTH Episodes 119 and 120). While Francis and I disagree on many aspects of the government’s response to the pandemic, ultimately we have developed a genuine friendship. As part of our work together, Francis suggested and exercise by asking me, “What makes up your web of beliefs?”
What is this “Web of Beliefs?”

With Dr. Francis Collins being the former director of the National Institutes of Health, one of the most notable scientists in American history, and the acting Science Advisor to the President of the United States, you might ask, “what could he possibly have in common with a blue collar podcaster from the Midwest”? Combine that with the notion that I have been an outspoken critic of the government’s response to the pandemic, and Dr. Collins played a significant role in that response.

By today’s standards, we should hate each other, or at least do a lot of yelling and name calling but we took a different path. It’s all about communication and seeing the humanity and values in who you’re speaking with. Don’t miss this incredible conversation where Francis and I discuss how this exercise, “The Web of Beliefs” showed us that we ultimately have more in common than what separates us. While some of our beliefs are very different, ultimately the values for which we stand are very much in line. This is what civility despite differences looks like.

Getting Along Isn’t Possible If We Aren’t Having The Conversation

Getting Along Isn’t Possible If We Aren’t Having The Conversation

I bring this up because we are just weeks away from yet another contentious election. Accusations are flying, hyperbole is everywhere. Many people are not even having the conversation, they are just going to their corners and staring with disgust at the other side. Hate for the opposition is thick in the air and little of what is said about those on the opposing side is probably true. What would the world, and more specifically our country, be like if people of opposing views had civil discussions again?

It’s been incredibly busy for me in recent weeks, which hasn’t afforded me a lot of time for guest interviews and editing. I am incredibly fortunate to have some great archived episodes with some outstanding guests that I can pull from. One such guest is my friend Angel Eduardo. Getting along, made possible through conversation, is something that Angel does very well. Through his insightful writing, his work with multiple organizations and, as a podcast host on the FAIR perspective podcasts, Angel continues to do incredible work to better the world in which we live.

Grace, Gratitude, Respect and Integrity… DTH Episode 128

Do you approach all of your personal interactions with grace, gratitude, respect and integrity mean to you? I make the statement every week on the DTH podcast that we cannot control everything that happens to us in life, but we can control how we react to it. This is really one of the personal accountability pieces that I refer to so often. Imagine if we all approached our personal interactions using these principles.

Grace

As written in an article in Christianity.com,ย  Grace is the Hebrew word chanan or the Greek word charis, meaning โ€œthe state of kindness and favor toward someone, often with a focus on a benefit given to the object.โ€ (Strongโ€™s Greek 5485).ย 

Gratitude

Something I talk about probably more often than anything else on the DTH podcast. Gratitude is the quality of being thankful and having a readiness for showing appreciation. I often contend that you cannot be a happy person without being a grateful person.

Respect

Respect is really about treating someone with admiration and appreciation and seeing the humanity within them as a person.

Integrity

Having a strong sense of integrity means you are a person who is honest and of strong moral character.

If all people were to approach their personal interactions with these 4 important principles, can you imagine how much better the world in which we live would be? so again, do you approach all of your personal interactions with grace, gratitude, respect and integrity?

Nothing Good Comes of Hate… DTH Episode 125

Nothing Good Comes of Hate

Iโ€™ve made the statement so many times on this podcast, but Iโ€™m reminded daily that nothing good comes of hate. There is no greater reminder in my mind than the speech given this past week, and other things said recently by the current President of the United States. For clarification, THE DTH PODCAST IS NOT POLITICAL. I want to make sure that is clear, but Hate is Hate and Iโ€™ll point it out when I see it.

People often make the statement, โ€œwords matterโ€. When labels are placed on large groups of people, and then those people are classified as a threat, bad things are bound to happen. Hate, no matter the context, is not healthy. The fact that our current President knows nothing about so many of what he calls โ€œright-wingersโ€ and โ€œultra-MAGA extremistsโ€, yet boldly spews his hatred for them, made me think of a conversation I recently had with my friend Daryl Davis.

Sunday Morning Comin Round… Squaring enhanced gun safety measures with personal gun ownership and the 2nd Amendment

โ€œIf there is any one secret to success, it lies in the ability to get the other personโ€™s point of view and see things from that personโ€™s angle as well as from your own.โ€ ~Henry Ford
In several of the conversations Iโ€™ve had the opportunity to have on the Derate the Hate podcast, many of my guests have either alluded to or outright expressed that one of the greatest problems we face in todayโ€™s toxic interactional climate is peopleโ€™s inability to understand, or unwillingness to understand, not only the opposing sideโ€™s point of view, but also to see the humanity in the person or persons expressing said point of view.
Sunday Morning Comin Round is meant to be a round table with a bit of a twist. Admittedly, this is an experiment, and my first time for attempting something like this. I can tell (as Iโ€™m sure will be evident), there is a learning curve. With that said, this is NOT A DEBATE, but rather an exercise in understanding each other, and reaching a point of mutual clarity through civility rather than agreement.